Category Archives: OMS

Programmatically Performing OMS Log Search Against a Large Result Set

Written by Tao Yang

When performing OMS log search programmatically, you will encounter an API limitation that will prevent you from getting all the logs from the result set. Currently, if the search does not include an aggregation command, the API call will return maxium 5000 records. This limitation applies to both the OMS PowerShell module (AzureRM.OperationalInsights) and searching directly via the Log Search API.

The return response you get from either the Get-AzureRmOperationalInsightsSearchResults cmdlet or the Log Search API, you will get the total number of logs contained in the result set from the response metadata (as shown below), but you will only able to receive up to 5000 records. Natively, there is no way to receive anything over the first 5000 records from a single request.

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Last month, I was working on a solution where I needed to retrieve all results from search queries, so I reached out to the OMS product group and other CDM MVPs. My buddy and the fellow co-author of the Inside OMS book Stanislav Zhelyazkov provided a work around. Basically, the work around is to use the “skip” command in subsequent request calls until you have retrieved everything. For example, if you want to retrieve all agent heartbeat events using query “Type=Heartbeat”, you could perform multiple queries until you have retrieved all the log entries as shown below:

  1. 1st Query: “Type=Heartbeat | Top 5000”
  2. 2nd Query: “Type=Heartbeat | Skip 5000 | Top 5000”
  3. 3rd Query: “Type=Heartbeat | Skip 5000 | Top 5000”
  4. … repeat until the search API call returns no results

I have written a sample script using the OMS PowerShell module to demonstrate how to use the “skip” command in subsequent queries. The sample script is listed below:

Here’s the script output based on my lab environment:

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Inside OMS book v2 Preview Chapters Release

Written by Tao Yang

Over the last few months, Stan, Pete, Anders and I have been very busy with writing the version 2 of the Inside Microsoft Operations Management Suite book. Although we still have few more chapters to finish, we have decided to release 3 preview chapters now.

The first preview chapter was released yesterday. It was Chapter 6: Extending OMS Using Log Search (http://insidethecloudos.azurewebsites.net/early-chapter-preview-of-inside-oms-version-2/). This chapter was written by myself, and reviewed by my MVP buddy Kevin Greene (@kgreeneit) and Pete himself. This chapter has covered several OMS functionalities that are based on Log search:

  • Saved Searches
  • OMS Computer Groups
  • Custom Fields
  • Custom Logs
  • Power BI integration

Since there aren’t many documentations out there on for OMS Power BI integration feature, I have specifically spent a lot of time on the Power BI integration feature, it makes up about half of this 73-page chapter.

I must say that Kevin has done a fantastic job reviewing this chapter. Kevin’s review was really thorough, when I got Kevin’s feedback, it literally blew my mind! So special thanks to Kevin and Pete for their effort reviewing this chapter.

Lastly, the next 2 preview chapters will be released shortly. Please keep eye on Pete’s blog (http://insidethecloudos.azurewebsites.net).

Be Cautious When Designing Your Automation Solution that Involves Azure Automation Azure Runbook Workers

Written by Tao Yang

caution-signOver the last few weeks, it occurred to me twice that I had to change my original design of the automation solutions I was working on because of the limitations of Azure Automation Azure Runbook Workers. Last month, my fellow CDM MVP Michael Rueefli has published an article and explained Why deploying Hybrid Runbook Workers on Azure makes sense. In Michael’s article, he listed some infrastructural differences between Azure runbook workers and the Hybrid runbook workers. However, the issues that I faced that made me to change my design were caused by the functional limitations in Azure runbook workers. Therefore I thought I’d post a supplement post to document my findings. Since these limitations are not documented in Microsoft’s official documentation site, please DO NOT assume this is the complete list, and it is still valid by the time you read it. I will try my best to keep this post up-to-date over the time. So, there are the limitations I found:

01. Windows Event Log Service is missing

Few months ago, I wrote a runbook that reads event log export .evt files and inject the records to OMS (http://blog.tyang.org/2016/12/05/injecting-event-log-export-from-evtx-files-to-oms-log-analytics/). This runbook uses a .NET class System.Diagnostics.Eventing.Reader.EventLogQuery to read events from the evt files. Few days ago, when I tried to implement a version of this runbook for a solution that I was initially planned to use Azure runbook workers, the runbook job failed when configured to run on Azure and I got a “RPC Server is unavailable” error.

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After some troubleshooting, I found the cause of this error. The .NET class EventLogQuery relies on the Windows Event Log service to read the evt files, but in the Azure runbook worker’s sandbox environment, Windows Event Log service does not exist. Therefore, I have no choice but changing the design the having this runbook to be executed on the Hybrid runbook worker.

02. Unable to Map Network Drives

In a runbook, I have a code block that maps a network drive to an Azure storage File Share and read some files. When ran it on the Azure runbook worker, I found it was not possible to map the network drive. Luckily I could use the Azure.Storage PowerShell module to access the files in the Azure File Share, so I had to update the runbook to accommodate this limitation.

03. Disk Size Limitation

In a runbook, I needed to extract a 2GB zip file. It failed to run on Azure runbook worker because of the insufficient disk space and I couldn’t even copy the 2GB file to the Azure runbook worker. I attempted to find the size of the system drive on the Azure runbook workers by using Get-PSDrive cmdlet but it did not return the disk size.

04. Unable to use Service Principals and Credentials to Login to Azure

In a solution that I was working on, I designed to use Service Principals (Azure AD applications) and credentials to login to Azure. This method worked perfectly when the runbook was executed on the Hybrid runbook worker, but does not work when running on Azure. After some researching, I found someone had the same issue and posted on Stack Overflow: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/37619377/login-azurermaccount-credential-immediately-expiring. Basically, using credentials with service principals is not supported when the runbook is executed on Azure runbook workers.

Based on my experiences so far, I’ve come to a conclusion that I should not automatically assume everything is going to work on Azure runbook workers when designing my solution. In future, I will make sure that I’ll test early and every step along the way if I am planning to have the runbook executed on Azure runbook workers.

If you have experienced limitations that are not listed here, please let me know and I’m happy to add them onto this post.

Managing Azure Automation Module Assets Using MyGet

Written by Tao Yang

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Background

Managing the life cycle of PowerShell module assets in your Azure Automation accounts can be challenging. If  you are currently using Azure Automation, you may have already noticed the following behaviours when managing the module assets:

1. It is difficult to automate the module asset deployment process.

If you want to automate the module deployment to your Automation Account (i.e. using the PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule), you must ensure the module that you are trying to import is zipped into a zip file and located on a public location where Azure Automation can read via HTTP (i.e. Azure Blob storage). In my opinion, this is over complicated.

2. Modules are not deployed to the Hybrid Workers automatically

If you are using Hybrid Workers, you must also manage the modules separately. Unlike Azure runbook workers, Azure Automation does not automatically deploy modules to Hybrid Workers. This means when you import a module to your Azure Automation account, you must also manually deploy it to your Hybrid Worker computers.

3. Difficult to maintain module version consistencies.

Since managing modules in your Azure Automation accounts and hybrid workers are two separate processes, it is hard to make sure the versions of your module assets are consistent between your automation account and hybrid worker computers.

Over the past few months, I have invested lot of my time on MyGet and looking for ways to close these gaps. Few months ago, I have released a PowerShell DSC Resource module called cPowerShellPackageManagement (http://blog.tyang.org/2016/09/15/powershell-dsc-resource-for-managing-repositories-and-modules/). By using this DSC resource module, we can easily develop DSC configurations for computers (such as Hybrid Workers) to automatically install modules from a PowerShell module repository (i.e. a MyGet feed). This approach closes the gaps of managing Hybrid Worker computers (item #2 on the list above). Today, I am going to discuss how we can tackle item #1 and #3. Before I start talking about my solutions, let me quickly introduce MyGet first.

What is MyGet?

Myget (www.myget.org) is a SaaS based package repository hosted on the cloud. It supports all the popular package providers such as NuGet, Npm etc. It can host both private and public repository (called a feed) for you or your organisation.

If you come from a developer or DevOps background, you may have already heard about MyGet in the past, or have used similar on-premises package repositories (such as ProGet). If you are an IT Pro, since you are reading this blog post right now, you must be familiar with PowerShell, therefore must have heard or used PowerShell Gallery (https://powershellgallery.com). You can use MyGet the same way as PowerShell Gallery in PowerShell version 5 and later, except you have absolute control of the content in your feeds. Also,  if you are using a paid MyGet account, you can have private feeds and you can control the access by issuing API keys. You can also create multiple feeds that contain different packages (PowerShell modules in this case). i.e. if you develop PowerShell modules, you can have a Dev feed for you to use during development, and also Test and Production feeds for testing and production uses.

Why Do I Need MyGet?

You may be a little bit hesitate to use PowerShell Gallery because it is 100% public. As a regular user like everyone else, you can only do very little. i.e. you can publish modules to PowerShell gallery, but you can’t guarantee your modules will stay there forever. Microsoft may decide to un-list your modules if they find problems with it (i.e. failed to comply with the rules set in the PSScriptAnalyzer). You also don’t have access to delete your modules from PowerShell Gallery. You can un-list your modules, but they are still hosted there. To me, PowerShell Gallery is more like a community platform that allows everyone to share their work, but you should not use it in any production environments because you don’t have any controls on the content, how can you make sure the content you need is going to be there tomorrow?

MyGet allows you to create feeds that you have total control, and as I mentioned already, with a paid MyGet account, you can have private feeds to host your IPs that you don’t want to share with the rest of the world.

MyGet also ships with other awesome features, such as Webhook support.

Automating Module Deployment to Automation Account

I have developed a runbook that retrieves a list of modules from a repository (i.e. your MyGet feed), and import each module to the Automation account of where the runbook resides, if the module does not exist or the version is lower than the latest available version from the module repository. Before importing, the runbook also tries to work out the module dependencies and import required modules in groups (i.e. the modules without dependencies are imported first).  Here’s the runbook source code:

Note: this runbook does not download and zip up PowerShell modules from the repository feed. Instead, it construct the URI to the underlying NuGet package and import the package directly to your automation account.

In order to use the runbook, you will need to create a automation variable first.

Name: ModuleFeedLocation

Value: <the source location URI to your repository feed>

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Note: if you are not sure what is the source location URI for your feed, check out this help document from MyGet website: http://docs.myget.org/docs/how-to/publish-a-powershell-module-to-myget. However, I don’t believe the documentation is 100% accurate. Based on my experience, no matter if you are using private or public feeds, the Source location URI should be:

https://www.myget.org/F/<feed-name>/auth/<api-key>/api/v2

The API key is available on the MyGet portal:

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if  you have connected to the feed as a PowerShell repository, you can also check using Get-PSRepository cmdlet:

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Other than the automation variable, you will also need to make sure you have the AzureRunAsConnection connection asset and associated certificate asset created. these assets are created automatically by default when you created your Azure Automation account:

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If you don’t have this connection asset, you can manually create it using PowerShell – this process is documented here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-au/azure/automation/automation-sec-configure-azure-runas-account

Once the runbook and all required assets are in place, you will also need to create a webhook for the runbook. It is OK to configure the webhook to target Azure workers (although targeting hybrid worker group is also OK, but not necessary).

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Once the webhook is created, go to MyGet portal, go to your feed then go to the Webhook section and add a HTTP POST webhook

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then enter a description and paste the runbook webhook URL. for the webhook trigger, only tick “Package Added”:

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Once the webhook trigger is created, everything is good to go. when next time you add a PowerShell module or update an existing module on your MyGet feed, it will automatically trigger the Azure Automation runbook, which will find the modules need to be imported and updated, and attempt to import them one a time.

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Tips:

Once you have configured your MyGet feed as a PowerShell repository on a computer running PowerShell v 5 or later, you can publish modules located on your local computer to the feed using Publish-Module cmdlet. You can also configure MyGet to get modules from another repository such as PowerShell Gallery. I have blogged this previously: http://blog.tyang.org/2016/09/20/pushing-powershell-modules-from-powershell-gallery-to-your-myget-feeds-directly/

If you want to configure multiple Automation accounts to sync with a single MyGet feed, you can simply create the runbook and required assets in each automation account, and add a webhook trigger for each instance of the runbook within your MyGet feed.

Things to Watchout

there are few things that you need to watch out when using this solution:

1. be aware of the limitations in Azure Automation

Some of these limitations may impact your module imports. you can find the official documentation here:  https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-subscription-service-limits#automation-limits

2. Unlike any NuGet repositories such as PowerShell Gallery and MyGet, Azure Automation does not support storing different versions of same module

This may cause some of the module imports to fail. For example, if you have a module called ModuleA (version 1.0) that is a dependency to ModuleB version 1.0. You have ModuleA 1.0, ModuleB 1.0 and 2.0 in your MyGet repository, the runbook will firstly import ModuleB 2.0 to your automation account first. then when it tries to import ModuleA 1.0, it may fail because it does not pass the validation test (by importing ModuleA 1.0 on the runbook worker computer). so prior to committing these kind of packages to a feed that’s being used by Azure Automation, make sure you test it first on another feed, and make sure you can successfully install and import the module on your local computer.

3. Do not load too many modules to the feed initially

Module import into Azure Automation account takes a lot of time. when running a runbook job on Azure workers, the runbook can run maximum 3 hours due to its fair share policy. so if you have a lot of modules to load in the beginning, you need to make sure the runbook job can be completed within 3 hours. or you may have to rerun the runbook to pickup the modules didn’t get imported in the previous runbook job. Alternatively, you can configure the runbook to run on a Hybrid Worker group, because the fair share policy does not apply when the job is being executed on hybrid workers.

Conclusion

If you use a dedicated MyGet feed to host all required modules for Azure Automation, you can use the cPowerShellPackageManagement DSC resource module I mentioned earlier in this blog post to automate the module deployment to Hybrid Workers. In the same time, by using the method described in this blog post, you have also got the Automation account covered.

Therefore, if you have both DSC configured for Hybrid Workers (i.e using Azure Automation DSC), and have this runbook and webhook configured, by adding a new package to your MyGet feed, your entire Azure Automation infrastructure is updated automatically.

My MVP buddy Alex Verkinderen also also done some interesting integration between MyGet and PowerShell Gallery. He is going to publish his innovation on his blog (http://www.mscloud.be/) soon, so make sure you subscribe to his blog Smile.

Lastly, thanks Alex for testing the runbook for me, and if anyone has any questions or suggestions, please feel free to contact me.

PowerShell Script to Import and Update Modules from PowerShell Repositories to Azure Automation

Written by Tao Yang

PowerShell Gallery has a very cool feature that allows you to import modules directly to your Azure Automation Account using the “Deploy to Azure Automation” button. However, if you want to automate the module deployment process, you most likely have to firstly download the module, zip it up and then upload to a place where the Azure Automation account can access via HTTP. This is very troublesome process.

I have written a PowerShell script that allows you to search PowerShell modules from ANY PowerShell Repositories that has been registered on your computer and deploy the module DIRECTLY to the Azure Automation account without having to download it first. You can use this script to import new modules or updating existing modules to your Automation account.

This script is designed to run interactively. You will be prompted to enter details such as module name, version, Azure credential, selecting Azure subscription and Azure Automation account etc.

The script works out the URI to the actual NuGet package for the module and import it directly to Azure Automation account. As you can see from above screenshot, Other than the PowerShell Gallery, I have also registered a private repository hosted on MyGet.org, and I am able to deploy modules directly from my private MyGet feed to my Azure Automation account.

If you want to automate this process, you can easily make a non-interactive version of this script and parameterize all required inputs.

So, here’s the script, and feedback is welcome:

Command Launching Microsoft Monitoring Agent Control Panel Applet

Written by Tao Yang

I have been refreshing my lab servers to Windows Server 2016. I’m using the Non GUI version (Server Core) wherever is possible.

When working on Server Core servers, I found it is troublesome that I can’t access the Microsoft Monitoring Agent applet in Control Panel:

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Although I can use PowerShell and the MMA agent COM object AgentConfigManager.MgmtSvcCfg, Sometime it is easier to use the applet.

After some research, I found the applet can be launched using command line:

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PowerShell Script to Create OMS Saved Searches that Maps OpsMgr ACS Reports

Written by Tao Yang

Microsoft’s PFE Wei Hao Lim has published an awesome blog post that maps OpsMgr ACS reports to OMS search queries (https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/wei_out_there_with_system_center/2016/07/25/mapping-acs-reports-to-oms-search-queries/)

There are 36 queries on Wei’s list, so it will take a while to manually create them all as saved searches via the OMS Portal. Since I can see that I will reuse these saved searches in many OMS engagements, I have created a script to automatically create them using the OMS PowerShell Module AzureRM.OperationalInsights.

So here’s the script:

You must run this script in PowerShell version 5 or later. Lastly, thanks Wei for sharing these valuable queries with the community!

OMSDataInjection Updated to Version 1.2.0

Written by Tao Yang

The OMSDataInjection module was only updated to v1.1.1  less than 2 weeks ago. I had to update it again to reflect the cater for the changes in the OMS HTTP Data Collector API.

I only found out last night after been made aware people started getting errors using this module that the HTTP response code for a successful injection has changed from 202 to 200. The documentation for the API was updated few days ago (as I can see from GitHub):

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This is what’s been updated in this release:

  • Updated injection result error handling to reflect the change of the OMS HTTP Data Collector API response code for successful injection.
  • Changed the UTCTimeGenerated input parameter from mandatory to optional. When it is not specified, the injection time will be used for the TimeGenerated field in OMS log entry.

If you are using the OMSDataInjection module, I strongly recommend you to update to this release.

PowerShell Gallery: https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/OMSDataInjection

GitHub: https://github.com/tyconsulting/OMSDataInjection-PSModule/releases/tag/v1.2.0

OMS Search Queries to Extract Rules from Various Assessment Solutions

Written by Tao Yang

Currently in OMS, there are 3 assessment solutions for various Microsoft products. They are:

  • Active Directory Assessment Solution
  • SQL Server Assessment Solution
  • SCOM Assessment Solution

Few days ago, I needed to export the assessment rules from each solution and handover to a customer (so they know exactly what areas are being assessed). So I developed the following queries to extract the details of the assessment rules:

AD Assessment Solution query:

Type=ADAssessmentRecommendation | Dedup Recommendation | select FocusArea,AffectedObjectType,Recommendation,Description | Sort FocusArea

SQL Server Assessment Solution query:

Type=SQLAssessmentRecommendation | Dedup Recommendation | select FocusArea,AffectedObjectType,Recommendation,Description | Sort FocusArea

SCOM Assessment Solution query:

Type=SCOMAssessmentRecommendation | Dedup Recommendation | select FocusArea,AffectedObjectType,Recommendation,Description | Sort FocusArea

In order to use these queries, you need to make sure these solutions are enabled and already collecting data. You may also need to change the search time window to at least last 7 days because by default, assessment solutions only run once a week.

Once you get the result in the OMS portal, you can easily export it to CSV file by hitting the Export button.

OMSDataInjection PowerShell Module Updated

Written by Tao Yang

I’ve updated the OMSDataInjection PowerShell module to version 1.1.1. I have added support for bulk insert into OMS.

Now you can pass in an array of PSObject or plain JSON payload with multiple log entries. The module will check for the payload size and make sure it is below the supported limit of 30MB before inserting into OMS.

You can get the new version from both PowerShell Gallery and GitHub:

PowerShell Gallery: https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/OMSDataInjection/1.1.1

GitHub: https://github.com/tyconsulting/OMSDataInjection-PSModule/releases/tag/1.1.1