Preventing Azure Automation Concurrent Jobs In the Runbook

Recently when I was writing an Azure Automation PowerShell runbook, I had an requirement that I need to make sure there should be only one job running at any given time. Since this runbook will be triggered by a webhook from external systems, there was no way for me to control when and how the webhook would be triggered. So I had to add some logic in the runbook that only execute the core code block if there are no other jobs running. The key for this technique is to use the built-in variable that is available in any Azure

Programmatically Creating Azure Automation Runbook Webhooks Targeting Hybrid Worker Groups

In Azure Automation, you can create a webhook for a runbook and target it to a Hybrid Worker group (as opposed to run on Azure). In the Azure portal, it is pretty easy to configure this ‘RunOn’ property when you are creating the webhook. However, at the time of writing this blog post, it is STILL not possible to specify where the webhook should target when creating it using the Azure Automation PowerShell module AzureRM.Automation (version 3.1.0 at the time of writing). The cmdlet New-AzureRMAutomationWebhook does not provide a parameter where you can specify the webhook “RunOn” target: there are

Be Cautious When Designing Your Automation Solution that Involves Azure Automation Azure Runbook Workers

Over the last few weeks, it occurred to me twice that I had to change my original design of the automation solutions I was working on because of the limitations of Azure Automation Azure Runbook Workers. Last month, my fellow CDM MVP Michael Rueefli has published an article and explained Why deploying Hybrid Runbook Workers on Azure makes sense. In Michael’s article, he listed some infrastructural differences between Azure runbook workers and the Hybrid runbook workers. However, the issues that I faced that made me to change my design were caused by the functional limitations in Azure runbook workers. Therefore

Managing Azure Automation Module Assets Using MyGet

Background Managing the life cycle of PowerShell module assets in your Azure Automation accounts can be challenging. If  you are currently using Azure Automation, you may have already noticed the following behaviours when managing the module assets: 1. It is difficult to automate the module asset deployment process. If you want to automate the module deployment to your Automation Account (i.e. using the PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule), you must ensure the module that you are trying to import is zipped into a zip file and located on a public location where Azure Automation can read via HTTP (i.e. Azure Blob storage).

PowerShell Script to Import and Update Modules from PowerShell Repositories to Azure Automation

PowerShell Gallery has a very cool feature that allows you to import modules directly to your Azure Automation Account using the “Deploy to Azure Automation” button. However, if you want to automate the module deployment process, you most likely have to firstly download the module, zip it up and then upload to a place where the Azure Automation account can access via HTTP. This is very troublesome process. I have written a PowerShell script that allows you to search PowerShell modules from ANY PowerShell Repositories that has been registered on your computer and deploy the module DIRECTLY to the Azure

Injecting Event Log Export from .evtx Files to OMS Log Analytics

Over the last few days, I had an requirement injecting events from .evtx files into OMS Log Analytics. A typical .evtx file that I need to process contains over 140,000 events. Since the Azure Automation runbook have the maximum execution time of 3 hours, in order to make the runbook more efficient, I also had to update my OMSDataInjection PowerShell module to support bulk insert (http://blog.tyang.org/2016/12/05/omsdatainjection-powershell-module-updated/). I have publish the runbook on GitHub Gist: View the code on Gist. Note: In order to use this runbook, you MUST use the latest OMSDataInjection module (version 1.1.1) because of the bulk insert.

Scripting Azure Automation Module Imports Directly from MyGet or PowerShell Gallery

There are few ways to add PowerShell modules to Azure Automation accounts: 1. Via the Azure Portal by uploading the module zip file from local computer. 2. If the module is located in PowerShell Gallery, you can push it to your Automation Account directly from PowerShell Gallery. 3. Use PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule from the AzureRM.Automation module. One of the limitation of using New-AzureRMAutomationModule cmdlet is, the module must be zipped and located somewhere online that Azure has access to. You will need to specify the location by using the –ContentLink parameter. In the past, in order to script the module

HybridWorkerToolkit PowerShell Module Updated to Version 1.0.3

Few days ago, I published a PowerShell Module to be used on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers called HybridWorkerToolkit. You can find my blog article HERE. Yesterday, my good friend and fellow CDM MVP Daniele Grandini (@DanieleGrandini) gave me some feedback, so I’ve updated the module again and incorporated Daniele’s suggestions. This is the list of updates in this release: A new array parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-AdditionalParameters”. This parameter allows users to insert an array of additional parameters to be added in the event data: A new Boolean parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-LogMinimum”. This is an optional parameter with the

New PowerShell Module HybridWorkerToolkit

23/04/2016 Update: released version 1.0.3 to GitHub and PowerShell gallery. New additions documented in this blog post. 21/04/2016 Update: updated GitHub and PowerShell gallery and released version 1.0.2 with minor bug fix and updated help file. Introduction Over the last few days, I have been working on a PowerShell module for Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. I named this module HybridWorkerToolkit. This module is designed to run within either a PowerShell runbook or a PowerShell workflow runbook on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. It provides few functions that can be called within the runbook. These activities can assist gathering information about Hybrid

OMS Alerting Webhook Support

Introduction Few weeks ago, OMS Alerting has introduced a new feature that enables the alert to trigger a webhook: This feature can be enabled with or without the existing 2 actions (email and Azure Automation runbook remediation). As we all know, the existing Azure Automation runbook remediation also leverages webhooks to trigger Azure Automation runbooks. I have previously posted a blog on OMS Alerting Walkthrough, and also presented Introduction to OMS Alerting in Windows Management User Group Netherlands, you can watch the recording on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEZZzIj66uU So, why do we need this new webhook feature? Comparing with the Azure Automation

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