Tag Archives: MimboloveOpsLogix

OpsMgr Alert Tuning using OpsLogix EZalert

Written by Tao Yang

EZAlert

OpsLogix has recently released a new product to the market called “EZalert”. It learns the operator’s alert handling behaviour and then it is able to automatically update Alert resolution states based on its learning outcome. You can find more information about this product here: http://www.opslogix.com/ezalert/. I was given a trail license for evaluation and review. Today I installed it on a dedicated VM and connected it to my lab OpsMgr management group.

EZalert Walkthrough

Once installed, I could see a new dashboard view added in the monitoring pane, and this is where we tune all the alerts:

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From this view, I can see all the active alerts, and I can start tuning then either one at a time, or I can multiple select and set desired state in bulk. Once I have gone through all the alerts on the list, I can choose to save the configuration under the Settings tab:

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Once this is done, any new alerts that have previously been trained will be updated automatically when it was generated. i.e. I have created a test alert and trained EZalert to set the resolution state to Closed, as you can see below, it was created at 9:44:57AM and modified by EZalert 2 seconds later:

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Once the initial training process is completed and saved, the training tab will become empty. Any new alerts generated will show up in the training tab, and you can see if there’s a suggested state assigned, and you can also modify it by assigning another state:

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And all previously trained alerts can be found in the history tab:

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You can also create exclusions. if you want EZalert to skip certain alerts for certain monitoring object (i.e. Disk space alert generated on C:\ on Server A), you can do so by creating exclusions:

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In my opinion, this is a very good practice when tuning alerts. when setting alert resolution states, you only need to do it once, and EZalert learns your behaviour and repeat your action for you in the future. It will be a huge time saver for all your OpsMgr operators over the time. It will also become very handy for alert tuning in the follow situations:

  • When you have just deployed a new OpsMgr management group
  • When you have introduced new management packs in your management group
  • When you have updated existing management packs to the newer versions

EZalert vs Alert Update Connector

Before EZalert’s time, I have been using the OpsMgr Alert Update Connector (AUC) from Microsoft (https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/kevinholman/2012/09/29/opsmgr-public-release-of-the-alert-update-connector/). I was really struggling when configuring AUC so I developed my own solution to configure AUC in an automated fashion  (http://blog.tyang.org/2014/04/19/programmatically-generating-opsmgr-2012-alert-update-connector-configuration-xml/) and I have also developed a management pack to monitor it (http://blog.tyang.org/2014/05/31/updated-opsmgr-2012-alert-update-connector-management-pack/). In my opinion, AUC  is a solid solution. It’s been around for many years and being used by many customers. But I do find it has some limitations:

  • Configuration process is really hard
  • Configuration is based on rules and monitors, not alerts. So it’s easy to incorrectly configure rules and monitors that don’t generate alerts (i.e. perf / event collection rules, aggregate / dependency monitors, etc).
  • Modifying existing configuration causes service interrupt due to service restart
  • When running in a distributed environment (on multiple management servers), you need to make sure configuration files are consistent across these servers and only one instance is running at any given time.
  • No way to easily view the current configurations (without reading XML files)

I think EZalert has definitely addressed some of these shortcomings:

  • Alert training process is performed on the OpsMgr console
  • No need to restart services and reload configuration files after new alerts are added or when existing alerts are modified
  • Configurations are saved in a SQL database, not text based files
  • Current configuration are easily viewable within the SCOM console

However, AUC has the following advantages over EZalert:

  • AUC supports assigning different values to different groups or individual objects. In EZalert, the exception can only be created for individual monitoring objects and it doesn’t seem like you can assign different value for this object, it’s simply on/off exception
  • Other than Alert resolution state, AUC can also be used to update other alert properties (i.e. custom fields, Owner, ticket ID,  etc.). EZalert doesn’t seem like it can update other alert fields.

Things to Consider

When using EZalert, in my opinion, there are few things you need to consider:

1. It does not replace requirements for overrides

If you are training EZalert to automatically close an alert when it’s generated, then you should ask yourself – do you really need this alert to be generated in the first place? Unless you want to see these alerts in the alert statistics report, you should probably disable this alert via overrides. EZalert should not be used to replace overrides. if you don’t need this alert, disable it! it saves resources on both SCOM server and agent to process alert, and database space to store the alert.

2. Training Monitor generated alerts

As we all know, we shouldn’t manually close monitor generated alerts. So when you are training monitor alerts, make sure you don’t train EZalert to update the resolution state to “Closed”. consider using other states such as “Resolved”.

3. Create Scoped roles for normal operators in order to hide the EZalert dashboard view

You may not want normal operators to train alerts, so instead of using the built-in operators role, you’d better create your own scoped role and hide the EZalert dashboard view from normal operators

Conclusion

I believe EZalert has some strong use cases. Unless you have a very complicated alert flow automation process that leverages other alert fields such as custom fields, owner, etc. (i.e. for generating tickets, etc) and you are currently using AUC for this particular reason, I think EZalert gives you a much more user friendly experience for ongoing alert tuning.

I have personally implemented AUC in few places, and I still get calls every now and then from those places asking help with AUC configuration and it’s been few years since it was implemented. Also I’m not exactly sure if AUC is officially supported by Microsoft because it was originally developed by an OpsMgr PFE at this spare time (I’m not entirely sure about the supportability of AUC, maybe someone from MSFT can confirm). Whereas EZalert is a commercial product, the vendor OpsLogix provide full support of  it.

lastly, if you have any questions about EZalert, please feel free to contact OpsLogix directly.

Upcoming Webinar: OpsLogix VMware Management Pack Overview

Written by Tao Yang

My next webinar with OpsLogix will take place on Wednesday 6th April 2016. In this webinar, I will demonstrate how to configure the OpsLogix VMware management pack, and provide an overview of this MP.

If you are interested in this MP, or looking for a solution for monitoring your VMware infrastructure, please make sure you attend this webinar because there are only limited places available.

You can find more details about this webinar from OpsLogix’s blog: http://www.opslogix.com/opslogix-vmware-mp-overview-with-tao-yang/

The registration is via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/opslogix-vmware-mp-overview-with-tao-yang-registration-23084853418

I’m looking forward to seeing you then!

OpsLogix Capacity Report Management Pack Overview

Written by Tao Yang

capacity-banner-bgJust over a month ago, I have blogged and presented a webcast comparing the OpsLogix Capacity Report Management Pack and the OMS Capacity solution. Since then, an update was released on this management pack and I’d like to take a moment to provide a proper overview for this MP. For those who have not used this management pack and are looking for a solution for capacity forecasting and management, I hope you will have some ideas on the capabilities this management pack provides.

Management Pack Introduction

The OpsLogix Capacity Report MP provides OpsMgr reports that can be used to forecast trending of any existing performance data collected by OpsMgr. Same as any other OpsMgr reports, the reports provided by this MP can be accessed from the reporting pane in the OpsMgr console, under “OpsLogix IMP – Capacity trending reports” folder:

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Installing and Configuring Management Pack

Other than the capacity report MP itself (OpsLogix.IMP.Capacity_v1.0.2.24.mpb), I was also given a zip file containing my license key. This zip file contains an unsealed MP (OpsLogix.IMP.Capacity.License.xml), which contains my license key and it is unique to my environment. I need to import the license MP into my OpsMgr management group together with the capacity report MP. Once both MPs are imported, you will able to see the reports from the folder shown in the screenshot above.

Reports

This MP offers the following reports:

  • Absolute value Report – Single instance
  • Absolute value Report – Multi instance
  • Percentage value Report – Single Instance
  • Percentage value Report – Multi instance
  • Percentage value Report – Multi instance Critical Only
  • Percentage value Report – Single instance Critical Only

I will now go through these reports.

Absolute value Report – Single instance

This report allows you to run a forecast report over any performance counters stored in the OpsMgr data warehouse DB. This report requires the following parameters:

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  • From: The start date for the forecast analysis. The default value is Today – 30 days
  • To: the number of forecast days. default value is 30 days from today
  • Time zone: choose the time zone of your choice
  • Available Rule Languages: The default value is English, when choosing another language, the performance rules that have display strings defined in that particular language (defined in <LanguagePacks> section in management packs) will appear in the “Performance Rule” drop down list.
  • Performance Rule: this drop down list contains all the performance rules available for the language that you have chosen.
  • Counter:  this drop down list contains the counters collected by the performance rule that you have selected. As the best practice, a perf collection rule should only collect one counter, so hopefully you should only see one counter on this drop down list.
  • Object: this drop down list contains the object associated to the performance rule and counter
  • Instance: this drop down list contains a list of available instances for the performance rule and counter.
  • Managed Entity: this drop down list contains a list of managed entities associated to the performance counter instances.

The report looks something like this:

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as shown in the screenshot above, the light blue line indicates forecasted future trending for the particular counter that you have chosen. The report also shows the forecasted change and value for the perf counter.

Absolute value Report – Multi instance

This report is very similar to the “Absolute value Report – Single instance” report. the only difference is, we can choose multiple instances in this report:

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As shown in the screenshot above, we are able to choose multiple instances in the “Instance” section (whereas in the single instance report, we can only choose one from the drop down list). The report output displays all instances that you have selected:

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Percentage value Report – Single Instance

When performance counters are being collected by OpsMgr, some counter values are absolute values (such as logical disk free space in MB). However, some the counter values are percentage based (i.e. % logical disk free space).the percentage value based reports are designed for the percentage based performance counters. Let’s take a look at the “Percentage value Report – Single Instance” report first. This report requires the following parameters:

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    • From: The start date for the forecast analysis. The default value is Today – 30 days
    • To: the number of forecast days. default value is 30 days from today
    • Time zone: choose the time zone of your choice
    • Number of days for Warning level: choose the warning threshold. – if the forecasted value reaches 100% (or 0% if reverse forecast direction is set to true) within the value specified in this field, the forecasted capacity state will be warning. The default value is 60 days.
    • Number of days for Critical level: choose the critical threshold. – if the forecasted value reaches 100% (or 0% if reverse forecast direction is set to true) within the value specified in this field, the forecasted capacity state will be critical. The default value is 30 days.
    • Reverse forecast direction: by default, the forecasted capacity state is changed when the forecasted value reaches 100%. But in some cases, we are more interested when the value reaches 0% (i.e. free disk space). In these scenarios, you can specify Reverse forecast direction to “true”.
    • Available Rule Languages: The default value is English, when choosing another language, the performance rules that have display strings defined in that particular language (defined in management packs) will appear in the “Performance Rule” drop down list.
    • Performance Rule: this drop down list contains all the performance rules available for the language that you have chosen.
    • Counter:  this drop down list contains the counters collected by the performance rule that you have selected. As the best practice, a perf collection rule should only collect one counter, so hopefully you should only see one counter on this drop down list.
    • Object: this drop down list contains the object associated to the performance rule and counter
    • Instance: this drop down list contains a list of available instances for the performance rule and counter.
    • Managed Entity: this drop down list contains a list of managed entities associated to the performance counter instances.

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As you can see from the screenshot above, I have chosen a perf collection rule that collects the % logical disk space for Windows Server 2012. Because this is the single instance report, we are only able to select one instance from the drop down list – in this case, the instance for the perf counter represents the drive letter of Windows Server 2012 logical disks. I have chosen D: drive as the instance, and selected all the D: drives on my Hyper-V hosts from the Managed Entity section.

For the third item on the report indicates according to the forecast, it will run out of space in 206.29 days. Since the warning threshold is configured as 400 days and critical is 200 days. The value 206.29 falls in between the warning and critical threshold, therefore the forecasted capacity state is warning.

For the last item (the 4th) on the report, the forecast indicates it will run out of capacity in 109.46 days, which is less than the configured critical threshold of 200 days, therefore, the forecasted capacity state is critical in this case.

Percentage value Report – Multi Instance

This report is similar to the “Percentage value Report – Single Instance”, but it allows you to select multiple instances for the perf counter you have chosen:

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In the example above, I have chosen the “% Logical Disk Free Space Windows Server 2012” perf collection rule, which collects the % Free Space counter for Logical disks on Windows Server 2012 computers. In this case, the instance represents each logical disk’s drive letter (as highlighted). Comparing with the single instance report, we are not only able to choose a specific drive (such as C: drive), but also any other drives (as shown below).

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Percentage value Report – Multi / Single instance Critical Only Reports

The last two reports from this MP are the “Percentage value Report – Multi instance Critical Only” and “Percentage value Report – Single instance Critical Only” reports. The only differences with these two reports comparing to the previously mentioned percentage value reports is, they filter out any items with healthy and warning forecasted capacity state, and only list the critical items:

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So if you don’t really care about the healthy and warning items, and only want to concentrate on critical items, you may find these 2 reports handy.

Summary

The OpsLogix Capacity Report MP provides generic forecasting reports that can be used against any types of performance data collected by OpsMgr. As long as the related perf counters are being collected by OpsMgr, the reports can be used when planning future capacities. The audiences of this MP can be anyone who are using OpsMgr (i.e. server admins, network admins, cloud and fabric admins, DBAs, LOB application owners, etc).

Lastly, if you have any questions, please feel free to contact myself, or OpsLogix sales team directly (sales@opslogix.com).

Demo – Creating an OpsLogix ProView Dashboard for an Existing OpsMgr Distributed App

Written by Tao Yang

Over the last couple of days, I have spent sometime with OpsLogix ProView.  The OpsLogix ProView is a product that could be a good alternative for the old OpsMgr Visio Add-in. I have recorded a short demo on how to quickly produce a dashboard for an existing Distributed App in OpsMgr.

As shown in the diagram below, the window on the right hand side is the original diagram view for a distributed app in the OpsMgr console, and the window on the left and side is what I produced in ProView.

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You can watch the recorded demo on YouTube:

OpsLogix VMware Management Pack Quick Overview

Written by Tao Yang

Recently, I have had chance to evaluate the OpsLogix VMware management pack. In this post, I will discuss my experience with this MP so far.

Setup and Configuration

Once the MP files are imported , you will be able to import the license from the licensing dashboard in the monitoring pane under the OpsLogix folder.

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Once the license is imported, you can manually add the VMware vCenter server from the “VMWare IMP COnfiguration dashboard” located under OpsLogix\VMware folder:

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I have create a service account in AD and give it admin rights in vCenter. I used this account to connect to vCenter on this dashboard.

Note: Please do not use an account with administrative privilege in your production environment. a normal user with top level read-only access will suffice.

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The OpsLogix VMware MP also has defined a resource pool that you can use for monitoring vCenter:

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By default, the resource pool membership is set Automatic (which means all management servers are a member of). you can change it to Manual membership and hand pick the management servers you want to be a member of this resource pool.

Alternatively, you can also pick another existing resource pool (or even create your own) in the OpsLogix VMware configuration dashboard. You can also use resource pools containing OpsMgr gateway servers to monitor your VMware environment.

Discovered Objects

This MP discovers and monitors the following components:

  • vCenter servers
  • Datacenters
  • Clusters
  • Datastores
  • ESX hosts
  • Virtual Machines
  • VM Networks
  • Various hardware components

Here’s the sample diagram view from my lab environment:

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The MP ships with a top level Alert view for all alerts generated by the MP:

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The MP collects data and queries the health state of the VMware components via the vCenter Managed Object Browser (MOB). I was impressed about how many performance counters are being collected by the MP. It also comes with a performance dashboard which you can view from the OpsMgr console:

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I have been asked many times before that what exactly does this MP monitor / collect? To answer the question, I’ve used MPViewer and exported all the monitoring MPs to Excel and make this SpreadSheet that contains all the rules and unit monitors.

This MP does not require any additional servers to monitor the VMware infrastructure as it leverages a resource pool to query vCenter. In my lab environment, since I have installed vCenter server on a Windows server, I also installed the OpsMgr agent on the vCenter server, so the server itself is monitored by OpsMgr.

Hardware Monitoring

As mentioned previously, this MP also monitors the hardware components in your VMware environments. In particular, the following components are discovered and monitored:

  • Battery
  • Fan
  • Memory
  • Network cards
  • Power Supply
  • Processor
  • Storage
  • Temperature
  • Voltage

This covers all the essential fabric components (Compute, Network and Storage), as well as the other hardware components such as PSU, battery, and physical environments such as temperature and voltage. the screenshots below are some sample state views taken from a demo environment:

Temperature

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Storage:

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Processors:

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Reporting

The reporting MP provides several availability reports for different VMware components:

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i.e. ESX host availability report:

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I’ve created a sample ESX host availability report, you can download it from HERE.

Note: all the reports shipped in this MP are linked reports, So if they don’t meet your requirements, you can always use other  existing reports in your management group (i.e. the performance reports from Microsoft Generic Report Library).

Squared Up Dashboard

I have created a Squared Up dashboard for this the OpsLogix VMware MP.

OpsLogix VMware Dashboard

If you are also Squared Up in your OpsMgr environment, you can download this dashboard and import this dashboard from Squared Up’s community site: https://community.squaredup.com/browse/download-info/opslogix-vmware/

Summary

If you’d like to know more about this MP, you can find the datasheet here: http://www.opslogix.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/VMware-MP-Datasheet-2016.pdf and the whitepaper here: http://www.opslogix.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/VMware-MP-White-Paper-2016.pdf

Automating OpsLogix Oracle MP Configuration

Written by Tao Yang

Introduction

One of the flagship management packs from OpsLogix is the Oracle Database MP. This MP provides several GUI driven wizard to help you creating your own monitoring solutions for Oracle by leveraging the OpsMgr management pack templates (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-au/library/hh457614.aspx). At this stage, the OpsLogix Oracle MP provides the following templates:

01. Oracle Alert Rule template

This template allows you to create a rule that checks a value from your oracle environment and generate alerts in the event that the value is detected or missing, depending on the configuration you have specified.

02. Oracle Performance Collection Rule template

This template allows you to create a rule that will collect performance data from your Oracle environment in order to visualize data on the performance view and reports.

03. Oracle Two-State Monitor Template

This template allows you to create a monitor that will check the health of an element according to the configuration that you have specified in the wizard. It will generate alerts when the monitor becomes unhealthy.

Like any other OpsMgr management pack templates, the above mentioned templates can be found in the Authoring pane of the OpsMgr console, under “Management Pack Templates”:

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Some Background on Management Pack Templates

The MP templates provide great ways for users to create complex monitoring scenarios without having to use MP authoring tools such as VSAE or Silect MPAuthor. The MP templates are designed to satisfy specific monitoring needs (i.e. Windows service monitoring, TCP Port monitoring etc.). From an OpsMgr admin and operator point of view, they are great, because each template provides a user friendly GUI driven wizard for you to create your monitoring solutions.

From a MP developer point of view, these templates are not easy to create – not only because you need to define the templates in the MP, but most of time, you also need to design the UI pages to be used in the wizard, which is very time consuming (not to mention these UI pages are written in C#). I have done it several times, and believe me, they are not easy! So every time when I see a MP offers management pack templates, I really appreciate the effort put in by the developers.

Although I think the management pack templates provides a user friendly GUI driven wizard for users to create their monitoring solutions, in my opinion, the biggest drawback is also the GUI wizard. It means you HAVE TO use the GUI wizard – it may become an issue when you have a lot of stuff to configure.

Let me give you an example based on my own experience. A few months ago, I was away attending a conference overseas and a customer needed to create hundreds of instances for the Windows Service monitoring template. Because they didn’t want to wait for my return, I was told someone spent a few days clicking through the wizard many, many times.

So what other options do we have? Fortunately, the management pack template instances can be created via OpsMgr SDK.

Automating MP Template Instance Creation

If you have been following my blog series “Automating OpsMgr”, you may have already read Part 17 of this series: Creating Windows Service Management Pack Template Instance, where I demonstrated a runbook leveraging the OpsMgrExtended PowerShell module and enabled people to create a management pack template instance (in this case, the Windows Service template) using one line of PowerShell script. This was a great example on how to create the template instances in mass scales.

OK, let’s go back to the OpsLogix Oracle MP… Just to put it out there, my experience with Oracle DB is very limited. Throughout the years I spent in IT, I’ve only been dealing with Microsoft’s SQL servers. Based on my experience with SQL, I know that every DBA will have a set of queries they regularly use to monitor their SQL environments. I assume this is also the case for Oracle. So, one of the first concerns I had when I started playing with this MP is, creating user defined monitoring scenarios could be very time consuming when using the management pack template wizards. Therefore, I spent few hours today, and produced 3 separate PowerShell functions that people can use to create instances for the 3 templates mentioned above. These functions are:

  1. New-OpsLogixOracleAlertTemplateInstance
  2. New-OpsLogixOraclePerfTemplateInstance
  3. New-OpsLogixOracle2StateMonitorTemplateInstance

Pre-requisites:

These functions requires the OpsMgrExtended Module on the computer where you are running the script. Please follow the instruction and setup this module first.

Download Link:

I have uploaded the code for above mentioned PowerShell functions to Github. You can download them from https://github.com/tyconsulting/OpsMgr-SDK-Scripts/tree/master/OpsLogix%20Oracle%20MP%20Scripts

Now, let’s test them, I will use the –verbose switch when calling these functions so you can see the verbose messages.

01. Creating a test MP

Firstly, I’ll create a test MP using the New-OMManagementPack command from the OpsMgrExtended module:

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02. Create an instance for the alert rule template (using PowerShell Splatting)

Calling the New-OpsLogixOracleAlertTemplateInstance function:

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03. Create an instance for the performance collection template

Calling the New-OpsLogixOraclePerfTemplateInstance function:

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04. Create an instance for the Two-State Monitor template

Calling the New-OpsLogixOracle2StateMonitorTemplateInstance function:

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Note: There is also a test.ps1 script in this Github repository. It contains the test parameters used as shown in the screenshots above.

Conclusion

As you may have noticed, these functions also have a parameter set to support the SMA / Azure Automation connection object (defined in the OpsMgrExtended Module). If you are planning to make this part of your automation solution, you can simply change this from a PowerShell function to a runbook and use the –SDKConnection parameter to establish connection to the management group. this should be very straightforward; you can refer to my previous post on the Automating OpsMgr blog series for more details.

I hope these functions will help customers who are deploying Oracle monitoring solutions using OpsLogix Oracle MP. For example, if you need to create a lot of these instances, you can create a CSV file with all the required parameters and values, and then create a very simple PowerShell script to read the CSV file and then call the appropriate functions. I’ve done the hard work for you, the rest should be pretty easy  Smile.

Lastly, if anyone would like to evaluate the OpsLogix Oracle MP, they can be contacted via email sales@opslogix.com

Capacity Planning – OMS Vs. OpsLogix Capacity Reports MP

Written by Tao Yang

Introduction

When it comes to data center / fabric capacity planning, currently there are 2 major solutions within Microsoft’s System Center and OMS space. These solutions are:

In this post, I will discuss the differences and similarities between these 2 solutions

OMS Capacity Planning Solution Overview

The OMS Capacity Planning solution was designed to provide an overview on the current and future utilisation of your virtualisation infrastructure and fabric. It is freely available for all OMS customers (well, you do have to pay for the OMS data consumption).

It collects a set of performance data via OpsMgr, and forecast your resource utilization based on the performance data collected.

If you have not used the OMS Capacity Planning solution yet and would like to learn more, here is a list of great resources for you:

To date, out of all the solutions that OMS provides, the Capacity Planning Solution is probably the one that has the most complex requirements. It requires:

  1. Hyper-V hosts managed by VMM
  2. VMM fully integrated with OpsMgr (configured via VMM console)
  3. OpsMgr connected to OMS Workspace
  4. VMM Management Servers and Hyper-V hosts onboarded to OMS via OpsMgr

Because of the nature of this solution, it collects a specific set of performance counters on VMM and Hyper-V servers to forecast the compute and storage fabric within your virtualisation infrastructure. It does not work for Other types of hypervisors that are being managed by VMM (i.e. VMware).

It provides some charts and diagrams which gives you a high level overview of your fabric.

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You can also access the performance data collected by this solution via Search (Type=Perf)

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OpsLogix Capacity Report MP Overview

Unlike OMS Capacity Planning solution, the OpsLogix Capacity Report MP is not a hybrid solution. It does not require integrations with any products. Once you have imported the Capacity Report MP and the license MP, you should soon see the number of reports deployed in your OpsMgr management group.

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As the names suggest, with the two absolute value reports, you can pick any performance collection rules for the language that you have selected (default to “English”).

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and the report lists each instance you have selected.

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The 2 columns on the left shows the forecasted changes and the forecasted value for each instance based on the time frame you have selected.

The percentage value reports are designed for the performance collection rules that are collecting percentage values. You can also specify warning and critical thresholds (in number of days) for the forecasted data.

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Or, if you only want to see the critical ones, you can use “Critical Only” reports.

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Comparison

Although both solutions provide forecasting capabilities for your infrastructure managed by OpsMgr, it serves different purposes.

OMS Capacity Planning solution collects a specific set of performance counters around the compute and storage fabric, and provides a high level view on what is the current and future capacity for the fabric in your Hyper-V environment. If you want to take a look at what counters are being collected by the Capacity Planning solution, you can export the following MPs from your OpsMgr management group and take a look using MPViewer.

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The OpsLogix Capacity Report MP provides a set of generic reports that can be used to forecast pretty much any existing counters that are being currently collected in your OpsMgr environment. This is purely a reporting MP, it does not collect any performance counters by itself.

Since the performance data collected by the OMS Capacity Planning solution is being saved only at your OMS workspace, you will not see these performance collection rules from the drop down lists in the OpsLogix capacity reports because they are not available in your OpsMgr Data Warehouse DB.

Although I have not personally tried it, theoretically, you can use the OpsLogix capacity report MP to produce forecasting reports for your Hyper-V environments (just like what the OMS Capacity Planning does), as long as you have configured OpsMgr to collect the same counters. Additionally, if you are using other hypervisors such as VMware and they are being monitored by OpsMgr, you can also use the OpsLogix capacity report MP for forecasting your fabric resource utilisation – this is something the OMS Capacity Planning solution does not provide.

Conclusion

I hope I have provided a high level overview and comparison between OMS Capacity Planning solution and OpsLogix Capacity Report MP in this post. If you have questions or feedback, please feel free to contact me.