Squared Up Upcoming V3 Dashboard with Distributed Application Discovery Feature

Squared Up is set to release the version 3 of their dashboard next week at Ignite North America. One of the key features in the v3 release is called the “Visual Application Discovery & Analysis” (aka VADA). VADA utilise OpsMgr agent tasks and netstat.exe command to discover the other TCP/IP endpoints the agents are communicating to. You can learn more about this feature from a short YouTube video Squared Up has published recently: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJK_3SritwY I was given a trail copy of v3 for my lab. After I’ve installed it and imported the required management pack, I was able to start

Pushing PowerShell Modules From PowerShell Gallery to Your MyGet Feeds Directly

Recently I have started using a private MyGet feed and my cPowerShellPackageManagement DSC Resource module to manage PowerShell modules on my lab servers. When new modules are released in PowerShell Gallery (i.e. all the Azure modules), I’d normally use Install-Module to install on test machines, then publish the tested modules to my MyGet feed and then my servers would pick up the new modules. Although I can use public-module cmdlet to upload the module located locally on my PC to MyGet feed, it can be really time consuming when the module sizes are big (i.e. some of the Azure modules).

Scripting Azure Automation Module Imports Directly from MyGet or PowerShell Gallery

There are few ways to add PowerShell modules to Azure Automation accounts: 1. Via the Azure Portal by uploading the module zip file from local computer. 2. If the module is located in PowerShell Gallery, you can push it to your Automation Account directly from PowerShell Gallery. 3. Use PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule from the AzureRM.Automation module. One of the limitation of using New-AzureRMAutomationModule cmdlet is, the module must be zipped and located somewhere online that Azure has access to. You will need to specify the location by using the –ContentLink parameter. In the past, in order to script the module

PowerShell DSC Resource for Managing Repositories and Modules

Introduction PowerShell version 5 has introduced a new feature that allows you to install packages (such as PowerShell modules) from NuGet repositories. If you have used cmdlets such as Find-Module, Install-Module or Uninstall-Module, then you have already taken advantage of this awesome feature. By default, a Microsoft owned public repository PowerShell Gallery is configured on all computers running PowerShell version 5 and when you use Find-Module or Install-Module, you are pulling the modules from the PowerShell Gallery. Ever since I started using PowerShell v5, I’ve discovered some challenges managing modules for machines in my environment: Lack of a fully automated

%d bloggers like this: