DSC Resource cPowerShellPackageManagement Module Updated to Version 1.0.0.1

Back in September this year, I published a PowerShell DSC resource called cPowerSHellPackageManagement. This DSC resource allows you to manage PowerShell repositories and modules on any Windows machines running PowerShell version 5 and later. you can read more about this module from my previous post here: http://blog.tyang.org/2016/09/15/powershell-dsc-resource-for-managing-repositories-and-modules/ Couple of weeks ago my MVP buddy Alex Verkinderen had some issue using this DSC resource in Azure Automation DSC. After some investigation, I found there was a minor bug in the DSC resource. When you use this DSC resource to install modules, sometimes you may get an error like this: Basically, it

OMS Search Queries to Extract Rules from Various Assessment Solutions

Currently in OMS, there are 3 assessment solutions for various Microsoft products. They are: Active Directory Assessment Solution SQL Server Assessment Solution SCOM Assessment Solution Few days ago, I needed to export the assessment rules from each solution and handover to a customer (so they know exactly what areas are being assessed). So I developed the following queries to extract the details of the assessment rules: AD Assessment Solution query: Type=ADAssessmentRecommendation | Dedup Recommendation | select FocusArea,AffectedObjectType,Recommendation,Description | Sort FocusArea SQL Server Assessment Solution query: Type=SQLAssessmentRecommendation | Dedup Recommendation | select FocusArea,AffectedObjectType,Recommendation,Description | Sort FocusArea SCOM Assessment Solution query: Type=SCOMAssessmentRecommendation

Injecting Event Log Export from .evtx Files to OMS Log Analytics

Over the last few days, I had an requirement injecting events from .evtx files into OMS Log Analytics. A typical .evtx file that I need to process contains over 140,000 events. Since the Azure Automation runbook have the maximum execution time of 3 hours, in order to make the runbook more efficient, I also had to update my OMSDataInjection PowerShell module to support bulk insert (http://blog.tyang.org/2016/12/05/omsdatainjection-powershell-module-updated/). I have publish the runbook on GitHub Gist: View the code on Gist. Note: In order to use this runbook, you MUST use the latest OMSDataInjection module (version 1.1.1) because of the bulk insert.

OMSDataInjection PowerShell Module Updated

I’ve updated the OMSDataInjection PowerShell module to version 1.1.1. I have added support for bulk insert into OMS. Now you can pass in an array of PSObject or plain JSON payload with multiple log entries. The module will check for the payload size and make sure it is below the supported limit of 30MB before inserting into OMS. You can get the new version from both PowerShell Gallery and GitHub: PowerShell Gallery: https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/OMSDataInjection/1.1.1 GitHub: https://github.com/tyconsulting/OMSDataInjection-PSModule/releases/tag/1.1.1

An Alternative Solution for OMS Capacity Planning Using Power BI Forecasting Feature

Introduction Back in September, the Power BI team introduced the Forecasting preview feature in Power BI Desktop. I was really excited to see this highly demanded feature finally been made available. However, it was only a preview feature in Power BI Desktop, it was not available in Power BI online. Few days ago, when the Power BI November update was introduced, this feature has come out of preview and became available also on Power BI Online. In the cloud and data centre management context, forecasting plays a very important role in capacity planning. Earlier this year, before the OMS Capacity

PowerShell Module for Managing Azure Table Storage Entities

Introduction Firstly, apologies for not being able to blog for 6 weeks. I have been really busy lately.  As part of a project that I’m working on, I have been dealing with Azure Table storage and its REST API over the last couple of weeks. I have written few Azure Function app in C# as well as some Azure Automation runbooks in PowerShell that involves inserting, querying and updating records (entities) in Azure tables. I was struggling a little bit during development of these function apps and runbooks because I couldn’t find too many good code examples and I personally

My Meetup Recording–Developing Your OWN OMS Solutions

Last month, I presented at the Melbourne Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Meetup on the topic “Developing Your OWN OMS Solutions” (https://www.meetup.com/Melbourne-Microsoft-Cloud-and-Datacenter-Meetup/events/233154212/). I recorded the session but then realise the recording had some technical errors due to the change of screen resolution without restarting Camtasia. This morning, I re-recorded the session and uploaded to the Meetup’s YouTube Channel. If you are interested, you can watch the recording here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUzI31iIcTk): And you can also download the slide deck HERE.

Feeding Your Power BI Reports from Azure Functions

Background Few days ago my good friend and fellow CDM MVP Alex Verkinderen (@AlexVerkinderen) had a requirement to produce a Power BI dashboard for Azure AD users. so Alex and I started discussing a way to produce such report in Power BI. After exploring various potential possibilities, we have decided to leverage Azure Functions to feed data into Power BI. You can check out the Power BI solution Alex has built on his blog here: http://www.mscloud.be/retrieve-azure-aad-user-information-with-azure-functions-and-publish-it-into-powerbi In this blog post, I’m not going to the details of how the AAD Users Power BI report was built. Instead, I will focus

Making PowerShell Based Azure Functions to Produce HTML Outputs

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been working with my MVP buddy Alex Verkinderen (@AlexVerkinderen) on some Azure Function related stuff. We have both written few PowerShell based functions that output a HTML page. These functions use the ConvertTo-HTML cmdlet to produce the HTML output. For example, here’s a simple one that  list 2 cars in a HTML table:

Today we ran into an issue while preparing for our next blog posts, after some diagnostics, we realised the issue was caused by the HTML output returned from the PowerShell based functions. If I use Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet in Powershell to

Securing Passwords in Azure Functions

09/10/2016 – Note: This post has been updated as per David O’Brien’s suggestion . As I mentioned in my last post, I have started playing with Azure Functions few weeks ago and I’ve already built few pretty cool solutions. One thing that I’ve spent a lot of time doing research on is how to secure credentials in Azure Functions. Obviously, Azure Key Vault would be an ideal candidate for storing credentials for Azure services. If I’m using another automation product that I’m quite familiar with – Azure Automation, I’d certainly go down the Key Vault path because Since Azure Automation

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