Scripting Azure Automation Module Imports Directly from MyGet or PowerShell Gallery

There are few ways to add PowerShell modules to Azure Automation accounts: 1. Via the Azure Portal by uploading the module zip file from local computer. 2. If the module is located in PowerShell Gallery, you can push it to your Automation Account directly from PowerShell Gallery. 3. Use PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule from the AzureRM.Automation module. One of the limitation of using New-AzureRMAutomationModule cmdlet is, the module must be zipped and located somewhere online that Azure has access to. You will need to specify the location by using the –ContentLink parameter. In the past, in order to script the module

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HybridWorkerToolkit PowerShell Module Updated to Version 1.0.3

Few days ago, I published a PowerShell Module to be used on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers called HybridWorkerToolkit. You can find my blog article HERE. Yesterday, my good friend and fellow CDM MVP Daniele Grandini (@DanieleGrandini) gave me some feedback, so I’ve updated the module again and incorporated Daniele’s suggestions. This is the list of updates in this release: A new array parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-AdditionalParameters”. This parameter allows users to insert an array of additional parameters to be added in the event data: A new Boolean parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-LogMinimum”. This is an optional parameter with the

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New PowerShell Module HybridWorkerToolkit

23/04/2016 Update: released version 1.0.3 to GitHub and PowerShell gallery. New additions documented in this blog post. 21/04/2016 Update: updated GitHub and PowerShell gallery and released version 1.0.2 with minor bug fix and updated help file. Introduction Over the last few days, I have been working on a PowerShell module for Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. I named this module HybridWorkerToolkit. This module is designed to run within either a PowerShell runbook or a PowerShell workflow runbook on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. It provides few functions that can be called within the runbook. These activities can assist gathering information about Hybrid

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OMS Alerting Webhook Support

Introduction Few weeks ago, OMS Alerting has introduced a new feature that enables the alert to trigger a webhook: This feature can be enabled with or without the existing 2 actions (email and Azure Automation runbook remediation). As we all know, the existing Azure Automation runbook remediation also leverages webhooks to trigger Azure Automation runbooks. I have previously posted a blog on OMS Alerting Walkthrough, and also presented Introduction to OMS Alerting in Windows Management User Group Netherlands, you can watch the recording on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEZZzIj66uU So, why do we need this new webhook feature? Comparing with the Azure Automation

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A Major Update for the SharePointSDK PS Module

Introduction This blog has been a bit quiet over the last few weeks. This is because I have been really really busy. I have spent a lot of time working on an updated version of the SharePointSDK PS module. Just in case you have not played with this module, here’s some background info: Just over a year ago, I posted a PowerShell / SMA / Azure Automation module on this blog called SharePointSDK. Few months ago, I have also published this module on Github and PowerShell Gallery. This module was designed to help automate operations around SharePoint lists (i.e. CRUD

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Azure Automation Runbook: Test-OMSAlertRemediation

Couple of weeks ago, I published a post titled OMS Alerting Walkthrough. I mentioned in the post that I have written a test runbook called Test-OMSAlertRemediation that extracts information from the OMS alert JSON input sends to you via email. Once you have created this rnbook in your Azure Automation account, you can use it as the remediation runbook for any OMS alerts. Source code: param ([object]$WebHookData) #Process inputs from webhook data Write-Verbose “Processing inputs from webhook data.” $WebhookName    =   $WebhookData.WebhookName Write-Verbose “Webhook name: ‘$WebhookName'” $WebhookHeaders =   $WebhookData.RequestHeader $WebhookBody    =   $WebhookData.RequestBody Write-Verbose “Webhook body:” Write-Verbose $WebhookBody $SearchResults = (ConvertFrom-JSON $WebhookBody).SearchResults

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OMS Alerting Walkthrough

Introduction Earlier today, the OMS product team has announced the OMS Alerting feature has entered Public Preview. This is indeed an exciting news and it is another good example that Microsoft is working very hard to close the gaps between OMS and the existing On-Prem monitoring solution – System Center Operations Manager. Alex Frankel from the OMS product team has already given a brief introduction on this feature from the announcement blog post. In this post, I will demonstrate how I used this feature to alert and auto-remediate an issue detected in my lab environment. Background Few months ago, I

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Azure Automation Runbook: New-FakeVirus

Often when you are playing with security related products, you would need to create dummy/fake viruses on your computers. The most common way to do this is to create a EICAR test file (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EICAR_test_file). I have used this method in the past when testing the Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection management pack in OpsMgr. Today I needed to use it again when I was preparing a demo for the OMS Malware Assessment. I thought, why not make an Azure Automation runbook that automatically create the EICAR test file for me on remote computers, so I can trigger it manually or schedule

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Start A Child Runbook From Azure Automation Hybrid Worker on the Same Hybrid Worker Group

Today I was writing a PowerShell runbook (let’s call it Runbook A) that’s designed to run on on-prem hybrid workers. At the end of Runbook A, I needed to kick off another runbook (let’s call it Runbook B) that must run on the same Hybrid Worker group. Because I don’t want to hardcode the Hybrid Worker group name in the script (or using an Automation variable), I wrote a very simple function that returns the Hybrid Worker configuration (including the Hybrid Worker group name) from registry if runs on a Hybrid Worker. To use it, simply place the function shown

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New Activity-Level Tracing Options for Azure Automation Graphical Runbooks

Nowadays, OMS / Azure Automation is full of surprises. almost every time I visit the OMS and Azure Automation portals, I’d notice new features being made available. Today, I just noticed a new setting for graphical runbooks called Activity-level tracing: You can now configure additional verbose tracing for graphical runbooks. Please note in order to leverage this new capability, you must also turn on verbose logging for the particular graphical runbook. Verbose Logging without Activity-level tracing: Detailed Activity-level Tracing Enabled: As you can see, once turned on, you can see a lot more verbose logging activities (starts with ‘GraphTrace”) for

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