Securing Passwords in Azure Functions

09/10/2016 – Note: This post has been updated as per David O’Brien’s suggestion . As I mentioned in my last post, I have started playing with Azure Functions few weeks ago and I’ve already built few pretty cool solutions. One thing that I’ve spent a lot of time doing research on is how to secure credentials in Azure Functions. Obviously, Azure Key Vault would be an ideal candidate for storing credentials for Azure services. If I’m using another automation product that I’m quite familiar with – Azure Automation, I’d certainly go down the Key Vault path because Since Azure Automation

Using Custom PowerShell Modules in Azure Functions

Like many other fellow MVPs, I have started playing with Azure Functions over the last few weeks. Although Azure Functions are primarily designed for developers and supports languages such as C#, Node.JS, PHP, etc. PowerShell support is currently in preview. This opens a lot of opportunities for IT Pros. My friend and fellow CDM MVP David O’Brien has written some really good posts on PowerShell in Azure Functions (https://david-obrien.net/). Although the PowerShell runtime in Azure Functions comes with a lot of Azure PowerShell modules by default (refer to David’s post here for details), these modules are out-dated, and some times,

Pushing PowerShell Modules From PowerShell Gallery to Your MyGet Feeds Directly

Recently I have started using a private MyGet feed and my cPowerShellPackageManagement DSC Resource module to manage PowerShell modules on my lab servers. When new modules are released in PowerShell Gallery (i.e. all the Azure modules), I’d normally use Install-Module to install on test machines, then publish the tested modules to my MyGet feed and then my servers would pick up the new modules. Although I can use public-module cmdlet to upload the module located locally on my PC to MyGet feed, it can be really time consuming when the module sizes are big (i.e. some of the Azure modules).

Scripting Azure Automation Module Imports Directly from MyGet or PowerShell Gallery

There are few ways to add PowerShell modules to Azure Automation accounts: 1. Via the Azure Portal by uploading the module zip file from local computer. 2. If the module is located in PowerShell Gallery, you can push it to your Automation Account directly from PowerShell Gallery. 3. Use PowerShell cmdlet New-AzureRmAutomationModule from the AzureRM.Automation module. One of the limitation of using New-AzureRMAutomationModule cmdlet is, the module must be zipped and located somewhere online that Azure has access to. You will need to specify the location by using the –ContentLink parameter. In the past, in order to script the module

PowerShell DSC Resource for Managing Repositories and Modules

Introduction PowerShell version 5 has introduced a new feature that allows you to install packages (such as PowerShell modules) from NuGet repositories. If you have used cmdlets such as Find-Module, Install-Module or Uninstall-Module, then you have already taken advantage of this awesome feature. By default, a Microsoft owned public repository PowerShell Gallery is configured on all computers running PowerShell version 5 and when you use Find-Module or Install-Module, you are pulling the modules from the PowerShell Gallery. Ever since I started using PowerShell v5, I’ve discovered some challenges managing modules for machines in my environment: Lack of a fully automated

PowerShell Module for OMS HTTP Data Collector API

Background Earlier today, the OMS Product Group has released the OMS HTTP Data Collection API to public preview. If you haven’t read the announcement, you can read this blog post written by the PM of this feature, Evan Hissey first. As a Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, I’ve had private preview access to this feature for few months now, and I actually even developed a solution using this API in a customer engagement with my friend and fellow CDM MVP Alex Verkinderen (@AlexVerkinderen) just over a month ago. I was really impressed with the potential opportunities this feature may bring

ConfigMgr OMS Connector

Earlier this week, Microsoft has release a new feature  in System Center Configuration Manager 1606 called OMS Connector: As we all know, OMS supports computer groups. We can either manually create computer groups in OMS using OMS search queries, or import AD and WSUS groups. With the ConfigMgr OMS Connector, we can now import ConfigMgr device collections into OMS as computer groups. Instead of using the OMS workspace ID and keys to access OMS, the ConfigMgr OMS connector requires an Azure AD Application and Service Principal. My friend and fellow Cloud and Data Center Management MVP Steve Beaumont has blogged

SharePointSDK PowerShell Module Updated to Version 2.1.0

OK, this blog has been very quiet recently. Due to some work related requirements, I had to pass few Microsoft exams. so I have spent most of my time over the last couple of months on study. Firstly, I passed the MCSE Private Cloud Re-Certification exam, then I passed the 2 Azure exams: 70-532 Developing Microsoft Azure Solutions and 70-533 Implementing Microsoft Azure Infrastructure Solutions. Other than studying and taking exams, I have also been working on a new version of the SharePointSDK PowerShell module during my spare time. I have finished everything on my to-do list for this release

HybridWorkerToolkit PowerShell Module Updated to Version 1.0.3

Few days ago, I published a PowerShell Module to be used on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers called HybridWorkerToolkit. You can find my blog article HERE. Yesterday, my good friend and fellow CDM MVP Daniele Grandini (@DanieleGrandini) gave me some feedback, so I’ve updated the module again and incorporated Daniele’s suggestions. This is the list of updates in this release: A new array parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-AdditionalParameters”. This parameter allows users to insert an array of additional parameters to be added in the event data: A new Boolean parameter for New-HybridWorkerEventEntry called “-LogMinimum”. This is an optional parameter with the

New PowerShell Module HybridWorkerToolkit

23/04/2016 Update: released version 1.0.3 to GitHub and PowerShell gallery. New additions documented in this blog post. 21/04/2016 Update: updated GitHub and PowerShell gallery and released version 1.0.2 with minor bug fix and updated help file. Introduction Over the last few days, I have been working on a PowerShell module for Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. I named this module HybridWorkerToolkit. This module is designed to run within either a PowerShell runbook or a PowerShell workflow runbook on Azure Automation Hybrid Workers. It provides few functions that can be called within the runbook. These activities can assist gathering information about Hybrid

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